Should you take your dog on an airplane?

Airline traveling with your pet can be a bit scary. Being separated from your dog, not knowing if they are cold or scared. It's tough! Here are some (hopefully helpful) tips. Federal Law MANDATES that a puppy must be at least 8 weeks of age before flying. They also must be completely weaned (That means at least 5 days). If your dog is in heat, or pregnant, she really shouldn't fly. It's always a good idea to see a vet before traveling. Most airlines will require a health certificate for your dog. Try to book non-stop flights. Other countries, Hawaii, and U.S. territories have different quarantines and health requirements. It's important to know that information well before you fly. REALLY IMPORTANT! Take a picture of your pet, just in case the airline loses your dog. Hopefully that would never happen, but it's better to be prepared. When you are traveling (not just flying), it's a good idea to have two ID tags on your pet. On one tag, have your dog's name or your name (or both), your HOME address, and your HOME phone number. On the other tag, write your destination address and phone number.

A couple of basics... give your dog food and water about 3-4 hours BEFORE flying. This will ensure that they have plenty of time to go to the bathroom, and they won't be flying on a full stomach. Also, get there early so you don't feel rushed. It will help both of you to feel more calm. Do a little research. Call your airline. Talk to a breeder (they fly dogs often) if you know one. Talk to your vet. All these things can help you make a good decision on whether or not to take your dog on a plane.

Should I "drug" my dog before flying?

Hi. I've heard that giving your dog some doggie relaxers before flying is good to help with their stress level. Is that true? I am flying with my dog in one month and I want to make sure it goes as smoothly as possible.

Don't drug dogs before flying

Actually, you do not want to drug your dog before flying. Many airlines won't allow it nor will vets even consider doing it for you. Here is why: (http://www.bringfido.com/airregulations.htm) According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, in most cases, dogs should not be given sedatives or tranquilizers prior to flying. An animal's natural ability to balance and maintain equilibrium is altered under sedation, which can be dangerous when the kennel is moved. Whether your dog is flying in the cabin or as a checked pet, he will be exposed to increased altitude pressures. This can create respiratory and cardiovascular problems for dogs which are sedated or tranquilized. Snub-nosed dogs (American Staffordshire Terriers, Boston Terriers, Boxers, Brussels Griffins, Bull Terriers, English/French Bulldogs, English Toy Spaniels, Japanese Chins, King Charles Spaniels, Lhasa Apsos, Pekineses, Pugs, Shar-Peis and Shih Tzus) are especially affected. While sedation is generally not advised, the decision on whether or not to prescribe a tranquilizer for your pet should be made by your veterinarian. If your veterinarian decides that tranquilizers are medically necessary, the name of the drug, the dosage, and how the drug was administered should be indicated on the dog's carrier. Airline traveling with your pet can be a bit scary. Being separated from your dog, not knowing if they are cold or scared. It's tough! Here are some (hopefully helpful) tips. Federal Law MANDATES that a puppy must be at least 8 weeks of age before flying. They also must be completely weaned (That means at least 5 days). If your dog is in heat, or pregnant, she really shouldn't fly. It's always a good idea to see a vet before traveling. Most airlines will require a health certificate for your dog. Try to book non-stop flights. Other countries, Hawaii, and U.S. territories have different quarantines and health requirements. It's important to know that information well before you fly. REALLY IMPORTANT! Take a picture of your pet, just in case the airline loses your dog. Hopefully that would never happen, but it's better to be prepared. When you are traveling (not just flying), it's a good idea to have two ID tags on your pet. On one tag, have your dog's name or your name (or both), your HOME address, and your HOME phone number. On the other tag, write your destination address and phone number.

Dog Ban

Is it true that some dogs are banned from flying?

Puppy flight travel

American airlines banned shipment of snub nosed breeds via cargo. Certain other airlines ban snubbed nosed breeds during the summer. Continental Airlines is the easiest to use for pet travel - they transport puppies in temperature controlled areas at all times so you dont have to worry about the temperature concerns.

Curio Kennel - Puppies in Cocoa, FL
www.twitter.com/curio_kennel

Certain airlines banned a

Certain airlines banned a few breeds ('fighting' dogs), also there is a temperature restriction for certain breeds. Check with the airline.

Banned breeds and airplane travel

It all depends on not only the airline but also the time of year. Many airlines have breed restrictions set in place during the summer months for brachycephalic breeds (short nosed breeds such as pugs, boxers, boston terriers, etc).

Here's the Humane Societies list of current airlines that allow dogs and some of the basic information for each airline as well as links.
http://www.hsus.org/pets/pet_care/caring_for_pets_when_you_travel/travel...

This link takes you straight to the airline pet policies so you don't have to do the searching yourself to find it:
http://www.tripswithpets.com/petpolicies.asp

Great Info

I had no idea that flying with a dog could be such a hassle. I have heard that some airlines will allow your dog to fly in the cabin with you. Is that true? Airline traveling with your pet can be a bit scary. Being separated from your dog, not knowing if they are cold or scared. It's tough! Here are some (hopefully helpful) tips. Federal Law MANDATES that a puppy must be at least 8 weeks of age before flying. They also must be completely weaned (That means at least 5 days). If your dog is in heat, or pregnant, she really shouldn't fly. It's always a good idea to see a vet before traveling. Most airlines will require a health certificate for your dog. Try to book non-stop flights. Other countries, Hawaii, and U.S. territories have different quarantines and health requirements. It's important to know that information well before you fly. REALLY IMPORTANT! Take a picture of your pet, just in case the airline loses your dog. Hopefully that would never happen, but it's better to be prepared. When you are traveling (not just flying), it's a good idea to have two ID tags on your pet. On one tag, have your dog's name or your name (or both), your HOME address, and your HOME phone number. On the other tag, write your destination address and phone number.

flying

they can go in the cabin if they are small enough to fit in a sherpa bag or small carrier under the seat. There are size requirements on the carrier. Otherwise they have to go in the cargo hold.

banned dogs

Some breeds were banned from American Airlines, but that ban has been lifted. As far as I know, there aren't any bans currently in place. However, some airlines don't fly pets at all. Other airlines have lots of restrictions. Do some research before you pick an airline.